What mysteries lie within the Bermuda Triangle?

 

The Lost Squadron of Flight 19, missing in the Bermuda Triangle.
The Lost Squadron of Flight 19, missing in the Bermuda Triangle.

“THE BERMUDA TRIANGLE—now there’s one for you, Jim,” Gaylord threw out the subject to his friend as they sat eating Monster Burgers and onion rings at their favorite eatery.

“That is such a hackneyed old idea, I had almost forgotten about it,” Jim responded. “A triangle in the ocean where all kinds of things vanish.”

“Yes, it seems kind of silly, now, doesn’t it? I must admit that I was very intrigued by it at one time, though. I was one of the first in line to buy the book by Charles Berlitz when I was in my mid-twenties. The grandson of the language expert wrote a detailed book about the mysteries of the triangle, published in 1974. It was really a good book—I still have it and when I was that age, I found these unsolved mysteries more believable.”

“That grandson was a language expert, too, as I recall, and, well, I believed them too. In all of these years, a few of the vanishings have been disproved, but many of them still remain rather nagging unsolved mysteries. What is your favorite incident from the book, Gaylord?”

“Oh it would have to be the disappearance of Flight 19,” Gaylord answered.

“Is that the American bombers?”

“Yes, that’s the one. The chilling drama began at about 2:10 pm on December 5, 1945. Five Avenger torpedo bombers left Fort Lauderdale, Florida to make a practice simulated bombing run. It was led by flight instructor, Lieutenant Charles G. Taylor and there were thirteen total crewmen in the five planes. Things started going haywire at about 3:40 pm. A message between Taylor and one of his men was intercepted by Lieutenant Robert Cox. Cox was airborne over Ft. Lauderdale on another military exercise. Cox broke into the conversation, made contact and asked Taylor what the trouble was. Taylor replied that his compasses were out and that they could not find Ft. Lauderdale. Cox kept Taylor on the radio off and on for over forty-five minutes. He told Taylor to look to the sun and orient himself that way. Taylor indicated he was not able to locate the sun. At some point he determined the planes only had about ten more gallons of fuel and they intended to try to fly west or run out of fuel trying to find a landing spot. Then the radio of Lieutenant Cox went dead.”

Navy Avengers similar to those that vanished without a trace in the Bermuda Triangle.
Navy Avengers similar to those that vanished without a trace in the Bermuda Triangle.

“It is very chilling to say the least. Experienced airmen can’t find the sun? The compasses go out? I assume they would have to have gone out on all the planes. Radios go dead? It does seem like all involved were being overtaken by unseen and unknown forces,” Jim agreed.

“And here’s the thing. If something crashes, there is usually a smoke plume, an oil slick on the water, but there were five planes and nothing like that was ever seen or recorded. It is like they vanished into thin air.”

“Didn’t they send up some more planes to investigate? I think something happened to one of those planes.” Jim asked the question, but he thought he knew the answer.

“Yes. When a ground station at Port Everglades, confirmed the strange communication Cox had with Taylor, a search was ordered. Two planes went up to scour the sea. One was a Mariner flying boat with a crew of thirteen. Contact was lost with it and it was never seen again. No wreckage was spotted of the Mariner, either. Some thought that it had exploded. It had sent one normal message, then, it just disappeared,” Gaylord confirmed.

“It is spooky. There were six planes in all that disappeared without a trace—twenty seven men, never seen again—and they were military, with military support nearby, and special equipment fairly close. It is quite the mystery.”

“There was a fellow in 1970 that is convinced he disappeared in the Bermuda Triangle and was somehow able to make an escape. It was December 4, and Bruce Gernon and his co-pilot were headed for Palm Beach from the Bahamas in a Beechcraft Bonanza. The pilots came upon a strange cigar-shaped cloud. They tried to avoid the cloud, but it came up and enveloped the plane. Inside, the cloud was rotating around them. It was like they were inside a tunnel. Gernon tried to guide the plane to a tiny opening on the other side of the tunnel. They felt themselves becoming weightless, the plane accelerated without their assistance. The plane’s compass began to rotate, counter clockwise, the other dials went haywire and they lost radar contact. When the aircraft was able to exit the tunnel they were not in the blue sky they had seen through the opening, but in a greenish haze. Gernon spotted an island and was convinced it was one of the Bimini Keys, but it turned out to be Miami Beach instead. This was impossible. A fight that takes 75 minutes had only taken 45. They had not used up the normal amount of fuel required for the flight. They had twelve extra gallons when they landed.”

“Wow!” Jim exclaimed. “I had never heard of that mysterious tale.”

“Bruce Gernon gave a few interviews over the years and he is convinced he and his copilot survived a time warp caused by the mysteries of the Bermuda Triangle.”

“Ooooo! If I wasn’t so busy eating these onion rings, I might sing, ‘Let’s Do the Time Warp, Now,’ Gaylord. It is pretty tempting.”

“That’s quite all right!”

Sara Marie Hogg is the author of The Scavenger’s Song.18469464

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