The Mystery Woman by Amanda Quick

The Mystery Woman by Amanda Quick Purchase:

    This is the second in the Ladies of Lantern Street and I really like the theme of this grouping- Lady Private Detectives disguised as Ladies Companions, or Governesses put in homes to act as guardians and detectives.

    The new Ladies of Lantern Street novel from Amanda Quick explores the crimes, passions, and paranormal secrets of Victorian London.

    Under the plain gray skirts of Miss Beatrice Lockwood’s gown, a pistol waits at the ready. For Beatrice is a paid companion on a secret mission – and with a secret past – and she must be prepared to fight for her life at any moment.

    Yet she is thrown oddly off guard by the fierce-looking man who joins her in foiling a crime outside a fancy ball – and then disappears into the shadows, leaving only his card. His name is Joshua Gage, and he claims to know Beatrice’s employers. Beyond that, he is an enigma with a hypnotically calm voice and an ebony-and-steel cane….

    Joshua, who carries out clandestine investigations for the Crown, is equally intrigued. He has a personal interest in Miss Lockwood, a suspected thief and murderer, not to mention a fraudster who claims to have psychical powers. The quest to discover her whereabouts has pulled him away from his mournful impulses to hurl himself into the sea – and engaged his curiosity about the real Beatrice Lockwood, whose spirit, he suspects, is not as delicate as her face and figure.

    He does know one thing, though: This flame-haired beauty was present the night Roland Fleming died at the Academy of the Occult. Guilty or not, she is his guide to a trail of blood and blackmail, mesmerism and madness – a path that will lead both of them into the clutches of a killer who calls himself the Bone Man….

    Review by Carol Mello:

    Amanda Quick
    Amanda Quick

    If the hero or heroine or both have a shady troubled past in Amanda Quick’s historical romantic suspense, it is a sign of their inner feelings that they are unworthy of love and therefore unworthy of marriage and children. I believe that the physically damaged hero, Joshua Gage, is one of the author’s suffering heroes and his scarred face and bad limp are a physical manifestation of his feeling a lack of worthiness to be loved. Before, when the hero had been whole physically, Emma had rejected his love for her. Her rejection led to both his damaged feelings and his damaged body.

    This is not the first time the author has used a physically damaged hero in her list of historical suspense so those who complain that the author is recycling plots have latched onto that as a reason to give this book a poor or mediocre review. This book can be looked at as a paranormal version of her other novel about the couple Charlotte and Baxter which was a regency period historical suspense romance. The novel with Charlotte and Baxter was superior to this one, one her bests, but that does not mean this book is a lousy read.

    In this novel Beatrice has a shady past so she feels unworthy of marriage and only worthy of a less respectable short term affair. Beatrice is hiding from a killer called the Bone Man who killed her father substitute and mentor Roland Fleming. Joshua Gage has been sent searching for her because he suspects her of blackmailing a relative and possibly of murdering Fleming.

    I am currently rereading this novel and rate it higher than some other reviewers because I like historical romance but I get tired of all the beautiful heroines and wealthy Dukes in the standard England based romances. I also do not object to the paranormal aspects of this or other titles by the author under this and other pen names.

    Review by Caroline Momof8:

    This is the second in the Ladies of Lantern Street and I really like the theme of this grouping- Lady Private Detectives disguised as Ladies Companions, or Governesses put in homes to act as guardians and detectives. I hope there will be more than a trilogy from the Flint & Marsh Employment Agency.

    Amanda Quick made her male protagonist quite a little different – I started to tell, but I should let the reader find out for themselves. Though the hero is not at all in the usual style, as the plot unfolds he manages to make himself into a hero almost any woman could take pleasure in.

    Obviously I did. Also, I fully enjoyed the twists and turns of the plot.