The Feathery by Bill Flynn

The Feathery by Bill Flynn Purchase:

    The Feathery is a touching story of a young man’s struggle to find his place in the world. It’s about loss, passion, and second chances.

    The Feathery plot centers around a unique type of golf ball used during a record match at St. Andrews, Scotland in 1849. It starts with a description of that golf match and how a feathery ball was made using 1849 technology.

    Fast forward to the 21st century where the story is set in San Diego, London, New York, Scotland and Ireland The game of golf blends with mystery and suspence surrounding an obsession so strong by some to own this valuable feathery golf ball that they’ll even commit murder to satisfy it.

    The owner of feathery, Scott Beckman, is a PGA touring professional who inherits the ball from his mentor, Sandy McNair, a decendent of that record setting St. Andrews player, Hugh McNair. Sandy was the club pro who had steared Scott and his friend, Matt Kemp away from trouble when they were teenagers.

    Sandy takes them under his wing teaches Scott the game of golf and Matt how to be the best caddie. They start out on tour after passing the grueling test of Q-School, but fail to make expenses. Scott reluctantly submits the feathery to a London auction. After he does so he starts winning and earning.

    He then pulls the feathery out of the auction much to the chagrin of a few scrupulous collectors and who are still determined to possess it by any means to include robbery, murder and kidnapping.

    Scott leaves the solution of the crimes up to Chief Inspector Trevor Bradshaw of Scotland Yard and Francis X. Riley of the NYPD while he competes at the British open in Turnberry, Scotland against hot competition.

    He is leading when his best friend and caddie Matt Kemp is abducted and a threatening note is sent to Scott with a piece of Matt’s ear lobe. The note tells him to withdraw from the tournament or more mutilation will occur.

    About Bill Flynn:

    Bill Flynn
    Bill Flynn

    Bill V Flynn is a retired Aerospace Engineer. Author of four books; A Deadly Class Reunion,The Feathery, A Drumbeat Too Near and The Beddington Incident. Bill lives in New Hampshire with wife Barbara.

    When not writing he travels the country sharing Barbara’s passion for hiking and bird watching while she tolerates his imperfect golf play on the perfect golf courses of this planet.

    Review by Mike Monahan:

    Bill Flynn is a master at weaving a string of stories that intersect for a marvelous conclusion. The history of the feathery and the game of golf is well researched and told in a delightful manner.

    Throw in the suspense of murderous thugs, auctioneers, and millionaires who covet the feathery at any cost, and you have a seriously entertaining novel.

    The Feathery is an easy, entertaining read whether you are a golfer or just like a good whodunit. Well done Bill.

    Review by Deborah Purdy Kong:

    Thirteen-year-old Scott Beckman and his best friend, Matt, are headed for a life of crime and jail unless something drastic happens to change their lives.

    Detective Kyle Ross sends them to Sandy McNair, an eighty-five-year-old golf instructor with a reputation for turning kids around. Through the game of golf, Scott improves his life by developing a passion and talent strong enough to make him a contender for major tournaments. When Sandy dies, he leaves Scott a valuable feathery golf ball made by a relative in 1849. Scott soon discovers that some collectors will do anything to acquire this heirloom.

    The Feathery is a touching story of a young man’s struggle to find his place in the world. It’s about loss, passion, and second chances. Author Bill Flyyn tells the story in a simple, straightforward manner. As a mystery author, I would have loved more conflict and tension during some of the crime scenes, yet Flynn certainly brings these aspects to crucial moments at tournaments.

    I’m not a golfer, but Flynn’s descriptions about various aspects of the game were interesting enough to make me wonder if I should try it one day. If you’re a golfing enthusiast you’ll enjoy this book and, if not, you might be by the end of the tale.