The Captive Boy by Julia Robb

The Captive Boy by Julia Robb Purchase:

    Julia paints a masterpiece with incredible accuracy and the reader walks the dusty path, breathes the hot western air, and experiences each and every move that her protagonist makes.

    Col. Mac McKenna’s Fourth Cavalry recaptures white captive August Shiltz from the Comanche, only to find August is determined to return to the Indians. McKenna attempts to civilize August and becomes the boy’s foster father.

    But when August kills another boy in a fight, McKenna rejects him. August escapes from Fort Richards (Texas), and when war with the Comanche breaks out, McKenna discovers August is a war leader–and his greatest enemy.

    Review by Bobbie Shafer:

    9753814It is obvious that Julia Robb did her research as this book is brought to life by her amazing dedication to detail. She takes you back and brings you into the world that The Captive Boy existed.

    Julia paints a masterpiece with incredible accuracy and the reader walks the dusty path, breathes the hot western air, and experiences each and every move that her protagonist makes.

    I was entranced and mesmerized by The Captive Boy and any reader interested in history, the west, the coming of age, the struggles of a young boy, or the adventures of a lifetime should read this book. It can be read by any age and will definitely by enjoyed by all. Please add this to your list to improve your home library.

    Review by Samuel L. Russell:

    I was fortunate to be given a final draft version of Julia Robb’s latest work, The Captive Boy. It is a fascinating true to life tale on the Texas frontier in the early 1870s. Ms. Robb’s thorough research and deft grasp of the history surrounding both native and army cultures of that fascinating era is remarkable.

    Coupled with her personal knowledge of the majestic Texas landscape, Ms. Robb weaves a compelling story of a young German emigrant child who is abducted by a Comanche band who killed his family. Adopted by the chief, assimilated into Comanche society, and raised a warrior, he is recaptured by the U.S. Cavalry as a teenager.

    Resistant to the honest, if not futile, attempts to reintegrate him into the white world, the boy makes his escape and swears revenge on the Cavalry. Robb captures the terror of Michno’s A Fate Worse Than Death and the engrossing narrative of a Terry C. Johnston novel using a complex style similar to how Bram Stoker presented Dracula, told from various diaries, newspapers, letters, journals, etc., each presented from different perspectives.

    Her characters have depth and the action moves the story along at a rapid pace. I don’t often read fiction, but greatly enjoyed Julia Robb’s The Captive Boy.