No Good Deed by M. P. McDonald

No Good Deed by M. P. McDonald Purchase:

    Ms. McDonald manages to keep ratcheting the suspense with every chapter.

    Mark Taylor discovers first hand that no good deed goes unpunished when the old camera he found during a freelance job in an Afghanistan bazaar gives him more than great photos. It triggers dreams of disasters. Tragedies that happen exactly as he envisions them. He learns that not only can he see the future, he can change it.

    Then the unthinkable happened and everyone ignored his frantic warnings. Thousands die. Suddenly, the Feds are pounding on his door and the name they have for Taylor isn’t urban hero. It’s enemy combatant.

    Review by Michael Gallagher:

    M. P. McDonald
    M. P. McDonald

    This book was highly recommended on one of the “What Are You Reading on Your Kindle” informal polls, so I tried out the free sample on my Kindle, enjoyed it, then bought the full book. For 99 cents, this is an excellent value: I certainly received as much – and probably more – value and entertainment out of this book than most of the “major publisher” authors, and you will, also.

    The author does an excellent job of getting you into the head of the characters, where you quickly can relate to the main character. I think I had just about every range of emotion possible while reading this book, and I distinctly remember at 62% of the way through the Kindle version feeling a little depressed because Mark was depressed, then around the 80% mark feeling elation because Mark was elated; this was a consistent happening throughout the book. To me, anytime the author can literally grab you and make you feel as if you are playing the role of the main character is a good thing.

    The author also makes you sit back and think about what is going on in the world of our anti-terrorism policies. Prior to reading this book, I had one set of preconceived notions of what is acceptable or not for those labeled as enemy combatants; about a third of the way through I found myself rethinking my own idea of what is the right thing to do. From the plot lines, getting into the head of the character, and the overall writing style I found I didn’t want to put this book down – I’m still thinking about it 24 hours after finishing it!

    Review by Lynn McNamee:

    The plot to the novel was not only unique, but it was wonderfully executed. The book opened with Mark Taylor, the main character, trying to find a specific apartment. Soon, I learned that he was actually looking for a baby that would die if he didn’t get there in time to warn someone. The book only got better from there.

    After Mark was arrested, I thought the tension would lessen, but Ms. McDonald managed to keep ratcheting the suspense with every chapter. The story unfolded skillfully, giving me just enough information at the right times to keep me wanting more without making me feel like I was being dragged. I just couldn’t put the book down. I had to know what happened to Mark and how it would all turn out.

    One thing that I really liked was how the author handled the political question of whether torture is a viable means of getting answers and information from terrorists. Through different character viewpoints, she showed both sides of the debate. Rather than taking one side or the other, the book allows the reader to really think about the issue and make their own conclusions.

    There was one instance of severe coincidence that allowed Mark’s girlfriend to save some of his personal effects. It was just a matter of lucky timing, I guess, but after so long, it was really lucky timing. I think that portion could have been done differently to somehow avoid the happenstance measure.

    I think the description gives away too much of the storyline. So, if you happen to be reading this review on my blog, or reading it prior to reading the description, to get the most out of the suspense, skip the book description on the Amazon Page. I was lucky in that I hadn’t read it when I started the book.

    The ending was especially nice in that, while it wrapped everthing up nicely, it didn’t meander around to explain later events. It ended abruptly at a perfect point in the story.