Featured: Killing the Ghost by Stephanie Parker McKean

Featured: Killing the Ghost by Stephanie Parker McKean Purchase:

The ghostly singing, scent of flowers and thumping on her walls at night seem less frightening when someone decides Sandy needs a dog.

Life’s hardships teach Sandy Greenmount to make lemonade from lemons—until a dead guy falls into her apartment when she opens the door and she is accused of murder.

No matter how sweet lemonade is to drink, Sandy finds herself submerged in a virtual sea of lemons: ghostly incidents at night; a hometown that ostracizes her for her father’s role in the drug-related death of three teens; ire when she refuses to paint signs for a bar owner, and ire when she does paint signs for an animal rescue organization and the signs are used at a protest at the local supermarket.

Sandy’s lemony philosophy of life gets a boost when Trig Webber sweeps into her life, but can she keep him when there’s competition from lovely red-headed Bekka, who works for Trig’s best friend? Sandy is plain and mundane—and someone wants her gone.

A vehicle smashes into the corner of Sandy’s sign shop profanity is spray painted on the bricks, a pig’s head with a sign sticking out of its ear is left at Sandy’s door and Sandy is pelted with rocks in the parking lot.

The ghostly singing, scent of flowers and thumping on her walls at night seem less frightening when someone decides Sandy needs a dog and smuggles a stolen Great Dane into her sign shop. Except—the big dog is afraid of everything.

Will Sandy be able to overcome all the “lemons” and create a new life for herself?

Stephanie Parker McKean

Meet Stephanie Parker McKean:

Writing is not something that I have ever possessed; it is something that has possessed me.

As a five-year-old I lived for show-and-tell days at school when students brought things to class and talked about them. I never had anything to bring—but I always had something to tell!

Me: A camel followed me to school. I tried to ride it, but it had slippery hair and I fell off.

Me: I didn’t forget my lunch. There was a lion in the street. He roared at me because he was hungry. I wasn’t afraid. I gave him my sandwich.

A parent-teacher conference ended my first grade story-telling career. I was instructed to quit telling lies.

When I was in the fifth grade, my father got an advance on his first book and came home with a pony in the back of our station wagon.

Me: Dad, what’s your book about?

Him: A boat-going detective who makes a lot of money.

Me: Is it true?

Him: No, it’s fiction.

That settled it. If a person could get paid for telling lies—that was my career.

I received my first rejection slip before I graduated from high school. Other rejection slips followed, along with a few checks. But no matter how many rejection slips, (I have 150 in my file) I kept writing, because like Jeremiah 20:9, His Word was in my heart like a burning fire shut up in my bones; I was weary of holding it back and I could not.

And…I just published book number 30.

Please click HERE to find Killing the Ghost on Amazon.