Dream On by Terry Tyler

Dream On by Terry Tyler Purchase:

    We get the realisation that love doesn’t always die in an instant – sometimes it suffers a long, confusing, and sorrowful demise (although one which then clears the way for a new shot at happiness).

    Dave Bentley was born to be a rock star.

    He believes he’s a reincarnated Viking warrior, too…

    When Dave forms his new band, Thor, there are plenty of sleepless nights for Janice, his on-off girlfriend and mother of his son. Not only must she deal with the thrills and spills of life as a hardworking single mum, but also the imminent return of singer-songwriter Ariel Swan, Dave’s one true love.

    Poor Janice. Dave is still the love of her life.

    Ariel Swan returns to small town life – and Dave’s heart.

    She and her friend Melodie (whose ambition is to be “a celebrity”) enter a TV talent competition, so Dave and the rest of Thor decide to make the most of the opportunity for possible fame and fortune, too.

    This adventure brings about big changes in the lives of all of them – none of which Dave could have anticipated.
    Review by Book Addict:

    Terry Tyler
    Terry Tyler

    I was initially drawn to this book because of the plot’s focus on music. My two addictions in life are books and music, and I’m happiest when I can combine the two. While Dream On definitely fulfilled its promise of taking readers on a journey into the world of rock bands and music, the story was so much more than that. The characters have tremendous depth. They lead the way here, as we watch them mature and pursue their dreams.

    Terry Tyler’s writing style is honest and easy to get lost in. At the end, when I read the last page, I felt like I was saying goodbye to friends. This is one of those books you experience rather than just read.

    Review by DB:

    Dream On is a fitting title for this colourful tale of musical ambitions and romantic desires: the vivid drama springing up around a cast of characters who all, in their different ways, are refusing to give up on their long-held goals, no matter how unlikely these appear.

    By setting the novel amongst normal working people – far from the idle pastures of Hampstead Heath – the drama intensifies as we delve into the lives of those who somehow need to fit their big dreams around the daily grind, troubled by unavoidable compromises. What this means is that even when these men and women appear deluded, there is a keen understanding as to why (and, after all, whose idea of him or herself doesn’t sometimes appear laughable in the cold light of day?).

    And while it would be easy enough to ridicule a small time rock group masquerading as Vikings in the pubs and clubs of North-East England, Terry Tyler never gives in to that temptation. Instead, as with her other characters, she treats these men even-handedly, explores their motivations, and fits them into a corner of the world which is entirely convincing on the page.

    Affairs of the heart are dealt with in depth, and Terry Tyler often achieves a real emotional complexity, especially in the case of the love triangle featuring Janice, Dave, and Max Stark. Here we get the realisation that love doesn’t always die in an instant – sometimes it suffers a long, confusing, and sorrowful demise (although one which then clears the way for a new shot at happiness). As well as the musical high-jinx, and multiple romantic scenarios, there is also a sensitive and moving sub-plot involving an elderly relative with Alzheimer’s which also rings true.

    By the end of the book I was longing to follow these characters even further along their paths in life. Thankfully, as I understand another novel in the series is available (Full Circle), I will soon get the chance to find out where their dreams lead them next.