Blogging whether you want to or not

I blog because it gives me an opportunity to spotlight my books to those who may never find them otherwise.

You blog because you have to keep your name in print. You have to keep your brand before the public.

I didn’t want to write a blog today.

But I did.

Why?

I’m supposed to.

That’s what our marketing guru told me when he developed our Website.

You have to keep your name in print.

You have to keep your brand before the public.

I believed him.

You have to write a blog every day, he said.

What?

It’s important, he said.

You can’t slack off, he said.

You can’t ever quit, he said.

So I’ll write a blog today for the two thousand, three hundred and nineteenth consecutive day.

I may have missed a day or two.

Don’t remember it.

But it’s possible.

And I missed writing a blog during the three months the site was down while being re-designed.

But here I am again.

I have nothing to say.

I hear you laugh.

I probably had nothing to say yesterday.

Or the day before.

But the words were there in print.

They show up every day like clockwork – usually at two-forty in the morning while the world outside my house is still dark, and not even the birds are singing.

I want the words there waiting when you wake up.

You may never see them.

You may never read them.

You may think you have better things to do.

And you’re probably right.

I thought I had better things to do.

But gnawing in the back of my mind was one thought I could not escape.

I have a blog to write today.

I can put it off.

I can wait until later.

But why?

It’s still there waiting for me.

Haunting me.

Sending me on a guilt trip I’d rather not take.

So maybe I’ll just quote an author. I did like a couple of points that John Steinbeck had to say about writing:

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  3. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

I didn’t have a lot to say today, but John did.

Maybe that’s enough.

It is for me.

It should be for any author.

I can’t worry about it. I have a novel to write and I’m a scene behind.

So I’ll leave you now.

I had a blog to write today.

For better or worse, for richer or poorer, I wrote it.

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